Finding clarity in the cloud

There’s little doubt that the digital revolution has provided businesses with more opportunities than ever before.

However, technology has also placed a bewildering array of apps, tools and processes at our fingertips.

That can be off-putting for those businesses still to take advantage of “the cloud” – the virtual network of computer services accessed through the internet and providing infinite possibilities.

Thankfully, it is possible to find clarity in the cloud.

At Pierce, we work with businesses varying in size and sector so we understand that every business is different.

Having been previously offered a one-size-fits-all package, many local businesses I have spoken to have been reluctant to adopt the online approach.

Unlike some accountancy specialists, who only supply one option when it comes to cloud-based bookkeeping packages, we find the best fit for our clients from one of five suppliers: Xero, QBO (Quickbooks Online), FreeAgent, Kashfolw and SageOne.

Choosing the right package enables us to select a service that is tailored more specifically to businesses’ individual requirements.

Cloud accounting is already providing benefits for hundreds of Lancashire businesses that previously relied on office-based systems, including:

  • Streamlined processes: cloud accounting software can extract key information from bills, receipts and invoices and publish the data to your accountancy software.
  • Increased accuracy: eliminating the need for manual data entry reduces the risk of human error.
  • Convenience: systems can be accessed anywhere and anytime if you have an internet connection. This provides both businesses and employees with flexibility as you are no longer tied to an office.
  • Up-to-date: through cloud accountancy, you no longer have to update your computer or network. The system automatically updates in line with the latest regulations, so businesses can be rest assured that they are fully compliant.
  • Secure: cloud accountancy services have been designed to be highly secure, preventing the risk of data being breached.
  • Communication: the system allows continual communication between the business and their accountant. This means that any financial problems can be detected and prevented before they arise.

Technology is constantly evolving and my advice is to speak to an expert who will help you demystify cloud accounting, providing a clearer view of the difference it could make to your business.

Cyber Risk

Cyber Risk

Derek Rigby

By: Derek Rigby

Cyber Risk is a growing concern to SME business particularly those conducting some or all of their business online.

Shellshock virus

At Sagar Insurances the instances of theft has dwindled during the past 12 months. Seldom do we see claim for the theft of equipment following a mid-night burglary. However, instances of criminals accessing computer systems to commit

  • fraud,
  • blackmail
  • theft

are on the rise.

Examples are:

  • A company had their computer system hacked and criminals tried to access the company’s online banking system using information stored on the computer.
  • A company had their accounts system hacked and the bank details on their invoice template changed.
  • A company had their telephone system hacked and all outgoing calls were redirected via a premium rate number.
  • A company whose customers predominantly traded online, had their website attacked and were unable to trade until the site had been rebuilt.

There are several ways to make sure you are protected properly but only one will help you put things right if it all goes wrong. The right Insurance policy will help cover

  1. costs of cleaning your system following at attack,
  2. fines that come with a Data Protection breach following the loss of personal data,
  3. loss of income because you are unable to trade whilst your system is down.

Here are some other ways of protecting yourself:

Keep it clean.

Run regular checks for Malware and make sure you’re running the most up to date antivirus software.

Complicated passwords.

Make sure your password is easy enough to remember but complicated enough that no one else can guess it. Mobile devices should always be locked, preferably with a password or pin but at the very least something more than a swipe to the right!

Use secure websites.

Look for a lock somewhere in the browser address line, or make sure the URL begins with “https,” as such sites encrypt log-in information before sending it to the server.

Damian Glynn

Damian Glynn

In a recent publication from Damian Glynn at

VRS Vericlaim

vrs_technical-bulletin_cyber-losses_feb14

He asks:

  • Is there a insured event?
  • Is the incident covered prima facie?
  • Is the incident excluded?
  • How long is it going to be investigated?
  • How will quantum be considered?

Contact us at Sagar for further information

Sagar bottom strip

Contact Details Telephone: 01282 858250

 

Windows 10 is here

Windows 10 is here.

By: Stuart Waddington

device_laptop_mini_start_Non-CortanaMarket_1x

Windows 10 is here. After months of public testing the final version of Microsoft’s new operating system is rolling out to machines around the world.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/features

Those with qualifying versions of Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 are able upgrade free of charge through an automated windows update.

Some users may have already noticed the Windows 10 notification appearing in their task bar. Domain joined computers (those part of a corporate network) may not have received this notification, but they could still be eligible for the free upgrade.

Whilst this may be welcome news for existing Windows users, it also brings with it a warning to those running non-Microsoft business applications such as desktop versions of Sage Accounts.

Sage

A number of Sage products will not be supporting Windows 10, at least not on its release date.

We strongly recommend those planning to take up the free upgrade to check that all their software is properly supported and compatible with Windows 10, before installing the update.

For Windows 10 compatibility with Sage software you can check the following link for up to date information:

https://my.sage.co.uk/public/help/askarticle.aspx?articleid=33532

For those who do decide to take up the Windows 10 upgrade, as ever we strongly recommend you take extra backup copies of all your data before proceeding.

For further information, or help with your software please contact it@pierce.co.uk

Make your business grow

We help you achieve your goals and make your business grow

By: Margaret Scott

Cloud Lady Success shutterstock_152011988

You want to grow your business and we want to help you.

The most successful business owners focus on doing what they do best – running their business – which is where we come in by effectively becoming your Online Services support team assisting you with your Online accounting systems while you take care of your business.

Use one of our online solutions and you retain full control and full access to your figures, at anytime and anywhere, so that when you need to make an important business decision, you have the facts at your fingertips. You also benefit from Support from our on-line accounts team.

Pierce combines all the convenience of 21st century technology with all the reassurance of a personalised working relationship.

Personal relationships matter

We spend time with you, getting to know you and your business so that we can truly have your business’s best interests at heart. We may not be sitting in your office but we’re on your team.

We can do the following:-

  • Provision of one of our cloud-based packages
  • Initial set-up of the package to meet your needs
  • The processing of your scanned purchase invoices and on-line bank statements proficiently and thoroughly, and management reports provided each month or quarter as required.
  • VAT returns reviewed by us before they are completed and filed

Data is secure, you can have restricted access or unlimited users. In the event of disaster you have peace of mind knowing that your data is safe and easy to recover because we arrange for the hosting of all of your accounts, real-time data and reports online so that you can access them at any time, 24/7 from anywhere in the world and because they’re hosted online, in the event of disaster you can rest assured that your figures and accounts are safe.

Contact Us shutterstock_212925412

Get in touch…

Call us                   01254 688124

Email us                m.scott@pierce.co.uk

 

 

1st April VAT rules change – not a joke

By: Margaret Scott

1st April VAT rules change – not a joke. The changes to the VAT rules relating to Prompt Payment Discounts may cause some problems, please do not hesitate to contact us for clarification and assistance.

The following information relates to a Sage Bulletin.

Sage

PDP – Prompt Payment Discount – what to do when you raise or receive a VAT invoice offering a PPD from the 1 April 2015 when the change takes effect.

Summary of Changes

Currently where businesses offer PPD terms to customers they calculate the VAT due on the discounted price. If the discount is not taken up HMRC does not require businesses to alter the amount of VAT invoiced and accounted for.

For example:

“.A discount of X% of the full price applies if payment is made within Y days of the invoice date. No credit note will be issued. Following payment you must ensure you have only recovered the VAT actually paid.”How can Sage ERP X3 customers meet these requirements?

 

  1. Correctly calculate VAT on Invoices.

Currently VAT may be calculated on the full value or the discounted value of an invoice, this is controlled the parameter BRIDISC.

From the 1st April 2015 to be in line with the new legislation, VAT must be calculated on the full value of an invoice:

  • In Sage ERP X3 V6 the parameter BRIDISC should be set to NO
  • In Sage ERP X3 V7 the parameter DEPMGTMOD (Discount management mode) should be set to 2 (Breakdown by VAT).
  • The payment attribute used for Early Settlement Discount should be set to Tax Recovery

From the 1st April 2015, businesses must account for VAT on the full consideration received for supplies of goods and services. Therefore invoices must calculate VAT with no reduction for PPD.

Where a discount is subsequently taken, it is therefore necessary to ensure VAT records are amended to reflect the lower VAT amount. Businesses may comply with this change in two ways;

  • Credit Notes must be issued for the difference.
  • Each party must make appropriate internal accounting adjustments.

When choosing the latter option businesses must add suitable wording to the terms of any discount.

  1. Provide details of Customer VAT responsibilities on Sales Invoices

We would recommend that our customers add suitable wording to their settlement discount terms rather than issue credit notes for each discount taken.

(Note: In the HMRC guidance there is an optional requirement for the invoice to show Total Gross, Total VAT and Total Net amounts with and without the discount appliedSage ERPX3 only shows totals without the discount applied).

  1. Make appropriate internal accounting adjustments

Sage ERP X3 has functionality to “claw back” VAT. VAT is calculated on the full invoice value, and when any PPD is taken in Cash Entry, the VAT element of the discount is calculated and posted to specified GL account(s), thereby recording the VAT clawed back.

If a part payment has taken place, at the time of the payment, the Settlement Discount line will have the full amount of the discount. This will also post the full amount of the VAT claw back which is not correct under the new legislation. It is recommended that customers change the ESD line on the payment to correctly account for the ESD on the part payment. This will result in the posting of the part of the VAT claw back that is relevant on the payment.

In the instance of a credit note being raised after the invoice has been paid, manual adjustments will need to be done.

What does this mean

a) If the customer pays the full price they record it in their records and no VAT adjustment is necessary.

b) If the customer pays the discounted price in accordance with the PPD terms on receipt of the invoice they may record the discounted price and VAT on this in their accounts and no subsequent VAT adjustment is necessary.

c) If the customer does not pay when the invoice is first issued, they must record the full price and VAT in their records as shown on the invoice. If they subsequently decide to take-up the PPD then:

  • If the supplier’s invoice states that a credit note will be issued, the customer must adjust the VAT they claim as input tax when the credit note is received. They must retain the credit note as proof of the reduction in consideration.
  • If they have received an invoice setting out the PPD terms which states no credit note will be issued, they must adjust the VAT in their records when payment is made. They should retain a document that shows the date and amount of payment (e.g. a bank statement) in addition to the invoice to evidence the reduction in consideration.

The invoice must contain the following information (in addition to the normal invoicing requirements):

  • The terms of the PPD (PPD terms must include, but need not be limited to, the time by which the discounted price must be made).

A statement that the customer can only recover as input tax the VAT paid to the supplier.

Worked Example

Example for a Sales Invoice, with Settlement discount 10%, VAT rate 20%, using Claw back:

Before 1st April

Invoice net value is £100.00, Settlement Discount is £10.00 (10% of 100), VAT is £18.00 (20% of £90.00). Cash paid is £108.00

GL Postings:

From GL Account Credit Debit
Invoice Control £118.00
Invoice Goods £100.00
Invoice VAT £18.00
Cash Control £118.00
Cash Bank £108.00
Cash Discount £10.00

 

After 1st April

Invoice net value is £100.00, VAT is £20.00 (20% of £100.00),  Settlement Discount is £12.00 (10% of £120). Cash paid is £108.00

GL Postings :

From GL Account Credit Debit
Invoice Control £120.00
Invoice Goods £100.00
Invoice VAT £20.00
Cash Control £120.00
Cash Bank £108.00
Cash Discount £10.00
Cash Claw back VAT £2.00

 

Example for a Sales Invoice, with Settlement discount 10%, VAT rate 20%, NOT using Claw back:.

GL Postings:

From GL Account Credit Debit
Invoice Control £120.00
Invoice Goods £100.00
Invoice VAT £20.00
Cash Control £120.00
Cash Bank £108.00
Cash Discount £12.00

 

GOV.Uk image 2727733_orig

Source: Gov.UK

A PPD is an offer by a supplier to their customer of a reduction in the price of goods and/or services supplied if the customer pays promptly; that is, after an invoice has been issued and before full payment is due. For example a business may offer a discount of 5% of the full price if payment is made within 14 days of the date of the invoice.

  • at present, suppliers making PPD offers are permitted to put on their invoice, and account for, the VAT due on the discounted price, even if the full price (i.e. the undiscounted amount) is subsequently paid. Customers receiving PPD offers may only recover as input tax the VAT stated on the invoice.
  • after the change, suppliers must account for VAT on the amount they actually receive and customers may recover the amount of VAT that is actually paid to the Suppliers.

Guidance

a) on issuing a VAT invoice, suppliers will enter the invoice into their accounts, and record the VAT on the full price. If offering a PPD suppliers must show the rate of the discount offered on their invoice (Regulation 14 of the VAT Regulations 1995 (SI 1995/2518)).

b) the supplier will not know if the discount has been taken-up until they are paid in accordance with the terms of the PPD offer, or the time limit for the PPD expires.

c) the supplier will need to decide, before they issue an invoice, which of the processes below they will adopt to adjust their accounts in order to record a reduction in consideration if a discount is taken-up.

d) when adjustments take place in a VAT accounting period subsequent to the period in which the supply took place the method of adjustment needs to comply with Regulation 38 of the VAT Regulations 1995 (SI 1995/2518).

e) suppliers may issue a credit note to evidence the reduction in consideration. In which case, a copy of the credit note must be retained as proof of that reduction.

f) alternatively, if they do not wish to issue a credit note, the invoice must contain the following information (in addition to the normal invoicing requirements):

  • the terms of the PPD (PPD terms must include, but need not be limited to, the time by which the discounted price must be made).
  • a statement that the customer can only recover as input tax the VAT paid to the supplier.

Additionally, it might be helpful for invoices to show:

  • the discounted price
  • the VAT on the discounted price
  • the total amount due if the PPD is taken up.

g) if a business has adopted the option at (f), the VAT invoice, containing appropriate wording as described above, together with proof of receipt of the discounted price in accordance with the terms of the PPD offer (e.g. a bank statement) will be required to evidence the reduction in consideration, and the reduction to the supplier’s output tax (in accordance with Regulation 38 of the VAT Regulations 1995).

h) we recommend businesses use the following wording on the invoice:

“A discount of X% of the full price applies if payment is made within Y days of the invoice date. No credit note will be issued. Following payment you must ensure you have only recovered the VAT actually paid.”

i) if the discounted price is paid in accordance with the PPD terms, then the supplier must adjust their records to record the output tax on the amount actually received.

If the full amount is received no adjustment will be necessary.

Customers:

On receiving an invoice offering a PPD a VAT registered customer may recover the VAT charged, in accordance with VAT Regulation 29 of the VAT Regulations 1995.

As adjustments may take place in a VAT accounting period subsequent to the period in which the supply took place the method of adjustment needs to comply with Regulation 38 of the VAT Regulations 1995 (SI 1995/2518).

In practice this will mean:

a) if the customer pays the full price they record it in their records and no VAT adjustment is necessary.

b) if the customer pays the discounted price in accordance with the PPD terms on receipt of the invoice they may record the discounted price and VAT on this in their accounts and no subsequent VAT adjustment is necessary.

c) if the customer does not pay when the invoice is first issued, they must record the full price and VAT in their records as shown on the invoice. If they subsequently decide to take-up the PPD then:

  • if they have received an invoice setting out the PPD terms which states no credit note will be issued they must adjust the VAT in their records when payment is made. They should retain a document that shows the date and amount of payment (e.g. a bank statement) in addition to the invoice to evidence the reduction in consideration.
  • if the supplier’s invoice does not state that a credit note will not be issued, the customer must adjust the VAT they claim as input tax when the credit note is received. They must retain the credit note as proof of the reduction in consideration.

 

Cloud Accounting our help and support

Cloud Accounting our help and support:

cloud keyboard shutterstock_239186986

By Margaret Scott

Reimagining with Cloud.

Successful digital businesses are holistically applying the concepts of mobile, social and big data to reimagine their business. Cloud creates the connections.

We realised over 2 years ago that online accounting, cloud systems were starting to become more popular and to this end we started to explore the market and began to use an online accounting product called Kashflow for some of our clients.

Currently

A lot has changed over this time and we have noted 5 cloud products that are making their mark :-

We know all five products and undertake training so that all our team are able to help clients by phone and on-line with whichever system they are using.

Going Forward

Accounts automated by scanner – this really is the 21st Century

Receiptbank allows us to scan in all the purchase invoices and it learns which nominal code to which it should be allocated. The invoices are then imported into the product eg Kashflow and the postings are automated.

Fast and effortless receipt submission

From paper to the cloud in a single snap

Instantly submit expenses via:

  • Phone app: using your camera
  • Paypal: automatic submission
  • Dropbox: direct importing
  • Email: simply email us
  • Post: single or batch send

OCrex allows us to scan in bank statements where we don’t have a live bank feed for the client.

Exploring the Future of Cloud Computing:

http://www.weforum.org/reports/exploring-future-cloud-computing-riding-next-wave-technology-driven-transformation

Riding the Next Wave of Technology-Driven Transformation

 
Exploring the Future of Cloud Computing: Riding the Next Wave of Technology-Driven Transformation

Cloud computing is seen by many as the next wave of information technology for individuals, companies and governments. The abundant supply of information technology capabilities at a low cost offers many enticing opportunities. In addition to reducing operational costs, cloud technologies have become the basis for radical business innovation and new business models, and for significant improvements in the effectiveness of anyone using information technology – which, these days, increasingly means most of the world.

Shellshock: New Computer Virus

From Margaret Scott

Shellshock: ‘Deadly serious’ new vulnerability found

Shellshock virus

A “deadly serious” bug potentially affecting hundreds of millions of computers, servers and devices has been discovered.

The flaw has been found in a software component known as Bash, which is a part of many Linux systems as well as Apple’s Mac operating system.

The bug, dubbed Shellshock, can be used to remotely take control of almost any system using Bash, researchers said.

Some experts said it was more serious than Heartbleed, discovered in April.

“Whereas something like Heartbleed was all about sniffing what was going on, this was about giving you direct access to the system,” Prof Alan Woodward, a security researcher from the University of Surrey, told the BBC.

“The door’s wide open.”

Some 500,000 machines worldwide were thought to have been vulnerable to Heartbleed. But early estimates, which experts said were conservative, suggest that Shellshock could hit at least 500 million machines.

The problem is particularly serious given that many web servers are run using the Apache system, software which includes the Bash component.

Patch immediately

Bash – which stands for Bourne-Again SHell – is a command prompt on many Unix computers. Unix is an operating system on which many others are built, such as Linux and Mac OS.

The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-Cert) issued a warning about the bug, urging system administrators to apply patches.

However, other security researchers warned that the patches were “incomplete” and would not fully secure systems.

Of particular concern to security experts is the simplicity of carrying out attacks that make use of the bug.

line

Analysis – Mark Ward, technology correspondent

security image security image

Shellshock rates a 10 on the scale of vulnerabilities. As bugs go, it’s about as bad as it gets.

Except that the last big bad bug, Heartbleed, rated an 11, according to one expert.

That should mean Shellshock isn’t as bad. Right?

Maybe. It’s too early to tell.

With Heartbleed, more work had been done by the folks that found it so it was easier to estimate who was at risk. There were lots of big targets, many of which had large user populations.

With Shellshock, the sheer number of potential victims is higher. And we do know that an exploit has been produced and some folks are scanning sites to see which are vulnerable to attacks based around that code.

So far, what’s keeping servers safe is the fact that cyber thieves are lazy and tend to copy what has already worked. Finding exploits is specialised, hard work so they only tend to pile in once that appears. With that code already in circulation, the early news about Shellshock may just be the first tremor of a much bigger quake.

line

Cybersecurity specialists Rapid7 rated the Bash bug as 10 out of 10 for severity, but “low” on complexity – a relatively easy vulnerability for hackers to capitalise on.

“Using this vulnerability, attackers can potentially take over the operating system, access confidential information, make changes, et cetera,” said Tod Beardsley, a Rapid7 engineer.

“Anybody with systems using Bash needs to deploy the patch immediately.”

Security firms have suggested that there is evidence Shellshock is being used by hackers.

“The vulnerability has already been used for malicious intentions – infecting vulnerable web servers with malware, and also in hacker attacks,” said Kaspersky Labs.

“Our researchers are constantly gathering new samples and indications of infections based on this vulnerability.”

For general home users worried about security, Prof Woodward suggested simply keeping an eye on manufacturer websites for updates – particularly for hardware such as broadband routers.

Free questions

The new bug has turned the spotlight, once again, onto the reliance the technology industry has on products built and maintained by small teams often made up of volunteers.

Heartbleed was a bug related to open source cryptographic software OpenSSL. After the bug became public, major tech firms moved to donate large sums of money to the team responsible for maintaining the software.

Similarly, the responsibility for Bash lies with just one person – Chet Ramey, a developer based at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio.

That such key parts of everyday technology are maintained in this way is a cause for concern, said Tony Dyhouse from the UK’s Trustworthy Software Initiative.

“To achieve a more stable and secure technology environment in which businesses and individuals can feel truly safe, we have to peel back the layers, start at the bottom and work up,” he said.

“This is utterly symptomatic of the historic neglect we have seen for the development of a dependable and trustworthy baseline upon which to develop a software infrastructure for the UK.

“Ultimately, this is a lifecycle problem. It’s here because people are making mistakes whilst writing code and making further mistakes when patching the original problems.”

Follow Dave Lee on Twitter @DaveLeeBBC

More on This Story

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SECURITY WARNING! – Heartbleed Bug

Security Warning – Heartbleed Bug

From:    Stuart Waddington

An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being called one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen. Writing about Heartbleed, security expert Bruce Schneier says “‘catastrophic’ is the right word. On the scale of 1 to 10, this is an 11.”

Heartbleed

The internet has a set of protocols for handling secure website traffic, commonly referred to as SSL (Secure Socket Layer). One common implementation of this protocol is known as OpenSSL which runs on around 66% of the web including popular sites such as gmail and facebook.

Vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software are now being patched with updates, you can check to see if a site remains vulnerable by using the Heartbleed test website.

What is not clear at this stage, is if any sensitive information has been harvested. Lots of software packages began using the vulnerable version of OpenSSL in December 2011, so for two years any website which used this technology was susceptible and the nature of this particular bug prevents site administrators from detecting if their sites were compromised during this time.

At this point there is no indication that hackers knew about the exploit before this week, there have been no confirmed password lists stolen. However, it is still a good idea to change all of your passwords as information could have been harvested from vulnerable websites during this period.

Although changing your password regularly is always good practice, if a site or service hasn’t yet patched the problem, your information will still be vulnerable. It’s worth waiting to make sure that each service you use has patched its servers using the above link before changing your password.

As always a strong password is important and the Heartbleed bug has also highlighted how important it is to use different passwords on each website that you use.

 

New apprentices thanks to NLTG

We are please to welcome two apprentices to Pierce.

Philip Johnson

Philip Johnson in Payroll

Tom Brassey

Tom Brassey in IT

Both have been recruited with the help of NLTG

From NLTG Managing Director,

Jim Harkness

Jim Harkness MBE.

We deliver Intermediate Level 2 Apprenticeships and Advanced Level 3 Apprenticeships in a wide variety of occupations – Furniture and Interiors Occupations, Woodmachining, Business Administration, Customer Service, Information Technology, Catering and Hospitality, Food Manufacturing, General Manufacturing, Warehouse and Storage, Glass Occupations, Carpentry and Joinery, Team Leading and Management.

We also offer the Study Programme, the exciting pre-apprenticeship programme tailored to suit the needs of young people aged 16-18 who are not yet ready, or able, to directly enter an Apprenticeship or employment.

We have a Centre of Vocational Excellence for the woodmachining and furniture trades and a new Vocational Centre of Excellence housing our Apprentice Recruitment department, Study Programme team and a state of the art Catering and Hospitality training facility.

For more information contact freephone 0800 7312455 (free from most landlines) or telephone 01254 395355. Alternatively you can email recruitment@nltg.co.uk or text your name to 07907 068421.

See more information on our upcoming open evenings

info@nltg.co.uk

NLTG Apprenticeships

Click here for vacancies

Spending time in a classroom, at college, after leaving school is not the first choice for many people. On leaving school, we understand that you may want to go out to work and earn a wage.

As an apprentice you will work in a full time permanent job, whilst gaining qualifications.

At NLTG we offer a variety of Intermediate Level 2 Apprenticeships and Advanced Level 3 Apprenticeships for young people aged 16-24. For more information on what each Apprenticeship involves, please click below on the occupation that you are interested or to the links on the left.

NLTG can help you to find work, achieve your goals and build a better future.

Click here to apply online.

For more information contact freephone 0800 7312455 (free from most landlines) or telephone 01254 395355. Alternatively you can email recruitment@nltg.co.uk or text your name to 07907 068421.

Apprenticeship Prospectus

 

Free Event – Optimise your Website for International Trade

Optimise your Website for International Trade 

20130913 Superfast Logo

Monday, 3 March 2014    

from 09:00 to 14:00 (GMT)

East Lancashire Chamber of Commerce, Accrington

This event will teach you the practical steps to boost your international business performance online. If you’re looking to export for the first time or already     experienced in exporting this hone in on what really matters giving you:

  • A clear vision and practical route map of how to become a world-class business online
  • An action plan to get started developing and optimising an international website for your business
  • The skills to plan your international  web strategy giving your business the potential to target international  customers more effectively to increase overseas sales
  • Leading edge web techniques to  structure, design and optimise your website for international visitors
  • Knowledge to increase your visibility on the international web, increasing the number of website enquiries from outside of the UK
  • Tips on free tools to help implement all of the above

Norma Foster

This event is presented by Norma Foster. As an International Trade expert she’s helped over 200 businesses on their export communications in the last 7 years. 85%  of these businesses are small to medium enterprises across the UK. In total  she’s coached over 2000 business people at every level to be more effective     and confident in winning overseas business. It’s not just an event, it’s a  great opportunity to meet with a wider network of small and medium size companies, and get access to content that can help your business grow internationally.

Places will be in high demand – so please book early by visiting the registration page at http://oywfit.eventbrite.co.uk 

For more information email     us at info@superfastlancashire.com

Follow us on Twitter     @superfastlancs